Welcome to Natasha Sazonova's Colorful World of Art Link to the Artist Self-Portraits Link to Genre Illustrations
Link to the mixed media artwork Link to Public Outdoor Art
Link to  the 1920s Flapper-related art Link to the Artist Biography, Art Resume and Art News
Link to Oil Paintings Link to the information about commissioned art and how to order paintings on commission
   
Contact NatashaSite Map

 

Expressionistic still life featuring a dress-form with a crimson velvet dress on it and 2 peeled tangerines sitting on a lime green chair.
**click artwork to enlarge**
(oil painting on canvas, 16X20, 2001)

"Still life with two tangerines"

As you've probably noticed I'm not exactly big on painting inanimate objects. Generally if it doesn't have a soul – I'm not interested in painting it. The '2 tangerines' happens to be a rare exception to most of my artwork. The piece is a painted snapshot of my living room corner circa 2001. I'm happy to report that the green chair in the painting is still alive and well. However, the dress-form and I have parted our ways long time ago. Nowadays both the dress-form and the crimson velvet dress dwell in my mother's tailoring shop where I can visit them from time to time.

The idea for the painting was born out of my 'absent-mindness'. I was working on some painting, got hungry, went to the kitchen to get some snacks, came back with 2 tangerines, peeled them and somehow managed to misplace them just as I was about to eat them. Despite my best efforts to remember where I could've put them I didn't locate the peeled fruit until I sat down to check my emails. Touching the back of my wet and sticky skirt I finally discovered the tangerines squished on a chair. Seeing them looking so sad and lonely with juice all around them made me think that they'd make a cool expressionistic painting. So I painted them right there and then....

"The more minimal the art, the more maximum the explanation."
Hilton Kramer

"It is not hard to understand modern art. If it hangs on a wall it's a painting, and if you can walk around it it's a sculpture."
Tom Stoppard

"The history of modern art is also the history of the progressive loss of art's audience. Art has increasingly become the concern of the artist and the bafflement of the public."
Paul Gauguin